Frequently Asked Questions

Here are some  commonly asked questions we get about Solar

What should I be expecting to save?

This is always a difficult question to answer as every person uses their power differently.

 

THE BELOW CALCULATIONS CAN BE DIFFERENT IF YOU HAVE SHADING OR ANY OTHER LOSSES.

 

If you have a 6.6 kW system you should be producing anywhere between 20-27 kW on average per day throughout the entire year.

 

You can check this figure on your solar monitoring app mentioned above.

 

Then you should be checking how much of that power produced is being sent back to the grid each day. This can be found in the ‘Feed in Tariff” part of your power bill pointed out above.

 

For the example above the total feed in amount was 3018 kW over 91 days, that works out to 33 kW’s of feed in per day on average over the billing period.

 

This is a large amount and I would assume this person has a large system of 10kw’s plus.

 

Let’s say the system produced 42 kW’s a day on average that means that 33 kW’s of that system is being sold to the grid and the other 9 kW’s is being used by the household everyday.

 

So that’s 9 kW’s of solar used by the household

33 kW’s sent to the grid.

 

In most cases you will pay a lot more for the power you buy from the grid than what you receive for the power you sell to the grid.

 

For example, if you pay 25c for power and receive 10c for feed in in this scenario daily you would save:

 

9 kW x 25c = $2.25 daily

33 kW x 10c = $3.30 daily

 

Which works out to $204.75 + $300.30 = $505.05 saved with solar power over the quarter.

 

Since most people will pay more for their power than what they receive for their feed in power it is best to use as much solar power during the day as you can in the household before it gets sent back to the grid.

 

This does not mean to use extra power than you usually do but to rearrange the way you use your power at the moment so that large loads such as washing machines, dishwashers, pool heaters/pumps, air cons, Hot water systems etc are running during sunlight hours.

If the above scenario were changed so that 33 kW’s were getting used by the household and only 9 kW’s were going back to the grid we can see a huge difference in savings.

 

33 kW’s consumed = $8.25 daily

9 kW’s sent to grid = $0.9 daily

 

= $750.75 + $81.90 = $832.65 saved over the quarter.

 

The lesson to be learned here is that solar power works great, and CAN save you a lot of money.

 

However, night time power is not free and can still rack up an expensive power bill. The way you use your power is essential to getting the most out of your solar system and saving as much power as possible.

 

If you are a high night-time user and cannot rearrange your night time usage perhaps you should consider a battery.

 

 

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